“National Maritime Museum”, Our Maritime History. Greenwich, London. HD



Mostly taken on a day trip to London 25th August 2012 (with some photo’s from a previous visit) using a Panasonic HDC-TM900 and a Fujifilm HS20.
Other British Museums on my Channel
British Museum; http://youtu.be/u04g-pHLPnM
Natural History Museum; http://youtu.be/ZC4vxP4BjM0
Science Museum; http://youtu.be/MxUniDpEFi8
Imperial War Museum; http://youtu.be/tHyvoGEG6oI
Royal Observatory, Greenwich; http://youtu.be/m8F6QJLOUNM
The National Maritime Museum (NMM) in Greenwich, England is the leading maritime museum of the United Kingdom and may be the largest museum of its kind in the world. The historic buildings forming part of the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, it also incorporates the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and 17th-century Queen’s House. Since earliest times Greenwich has had associations with the sea and navigation. It was a landing place for the Romans; Henry VIII lived here; the navy has roots on the waterfront; and Charles II founded the Royal Observatory in 1675 for “finding the longitude of places”. The home of Greenwich Mean Time and the Prime Meridian since 1884, Greenwich has long been a centre for astronomical study, while navigators across the world have set their clocks according to its time of day. A painting of the Great Comet of 1843 that was created by astronomer Charles Piazzi Smyth. The Museum has the most important holdings in the world on the history of Britain at sea comprising more than two million items, including maritime art (both British and 17th-century Dutch), cartography, manuscripts including official public records, ship models and plans, scientific and navigational instruments, instruments for time-keeping and astronomy (based at the Observatory). Its British portraits collection is exceeded in size only by that of the National Portrait Gallery and its holdings relating to Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson and Captain James Cook, among many other individuals, are unrivalled.